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Not understanding a portion of “You Bright and Risen Angels”: send help

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“Speaking of the moment when bats ‘fluttered away from the insectivore line and gave rise to ourselves’... ‘What fragment of man, perhaps a useful fragment, departed with them?’”

This passage is driving me nuts. Is it saying that bats came about from insects? Then saying that humans came about from bats? “-ivore,” I guess, implies that they fluttered away from eating insects, but I don’t see how that leads to “giving rise to ourselves.” Ultimately, it seems to be saying that bats ate insects then began to feed on us before fluttering away from us. I get that. I’m just uncertain on how the sentences go about communicating that.

As a side note, I believe I’ve asked this at another time in another post in a different manner, but how do you handle passages/sentences/etc that you don’t understand? Mark it and return, brute-force it, or maybe even ignore it?

I think that for me, there’s a certain level of anxiety with not getting something, particularly literary texts. It really drives me nuts. I enjoy and love chewing on a text, whether it be the slow-burn of reading a big book or chewing on the micro, sentence-by-sentence basis. But the fear of not being smart enough or, rather, being too dumb for XYZ is stressful at times. Maybe it boils down to a lack of patience or maturity, as not understanding something can put me in a small frenzy while simultaneously getting me “stuck” on the passage. It’s hard to progress in a book when I’m obsessing over a sentence I don’t fully understand.

Take the opening sentence of The Recognitions. It’s amazing (you can preview the book and the sentence on Amazon if you don’t have it handy; use desktop mode if you’re on mobile). Chewing on that sentence was absolutely a blast. It took me a while to understand what it meant, and I still haven’t gotten around to articulating how the sentence works or what it’s actually saying.

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i've never read the book, so take this all with a grain of salt. but my understanding of the quote is that the writer is playing with the idea that bats diverged evolutionarily from some group containing insectivores and humans, or diverged from insectivores before humans did, something along those lines. i'm no biologist but according to my amateur reading of a phylogenetic tree i googled, bats (order chiroptera) diverged from a larger category including both humans (primates) and order rodentia (insectivores). (some bats are also insectivores apparently, but they're more genetically distant from humans than some of their fellow insectivores.) anyway, the statement seems more or less factually correct. shareit app vidmate apk

Edited by player12314779

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On 19/11/2021 at 3:17 AM, player12183848 said:

“Speaking of the moment when bats ‘fluttered away from the insectivore line and gave rise to ourselves’... ‘What fragment of man, perhaps a useful fragment, departed with them?’”

This passage is driving me nuts. Is it saying that bats came about from insects? Then saying that humans came about from bats? “-ivore,” I guess, implies that they fluttered away from eating insects, but I don’t see how that leads to “giving rise to ourselves.” Ultimately, it seems to be saying that bats ate insects then began to feed on us before fluttering away from us. I get that. I’m just uncertain on how the sentences go about communicating that.

As a side note, I believe I’ve asked this at another time in another post in a different manner, but how do you handle passages/sentences/etc that you don’t understand? Mark it and return, brute-force it https://showbox.bio/  https://tutuapp.uno/ https://vidmate.cool/, or maybe even ignore it?

I think that for me, there’s a certain level of anxiety with not getting something, particularly literary texts. It really drives me nuts. I enjoy and love chewing on a text, whether it be the slow-burn of reading a big book or chewing on the micro, sentence-by-sentence basis. But the fear of not being smart enough or, rather, being too dumb for XYZ is stressful at times. Maybe it boils down to a lack of patience or maturity, as not understanding something can put me in a small frenzy while simultaneously getting me “stuck” on the passage. It’s hard to progress in a book when I’m obsessing over a sentence I don’t fully understand.

Take the opening sentence of The Recognitions. It’s amazing (you can preview the book and the sentence on Amazon if you don’t have it handy; use desktop mode if you’re on mobile). Chewing on that sentence was absolutely a blast. It took me a while to understand what it meant, and I still haven’t gotten around to articulating how the sentence works or what it’s actually saying.

I got this,...

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